Program

Oct. 15, 2019

The STTPA Conference will consist of three full days from Wednesday, October 16 to Friday, October 18 at the University of Toronto Mississauga campus in
Maanjiwe Nendamowinan and the Instructional Centre.

There will also be a Welcome and Registration the afternoon of Tuesday October 15 from 3:30 to 5:30PM.

All registered participants are welcome to join us for light refreshments. Please see the final conference program below, only minor changes will be made.

Please note that there will be photographs and video recordings throughout the conference. If you have any concerns, please come to the registration desk

Program Schedule
Time Event
8:00

Registration & Morning Refreshments

Location: Outside IB 120
8:45

Opening Ceremony and Plenary Session  |  Chaired by: Kent Moore

Welcome by: Amrita Daniere, Saher Fazilat, Shashi Kant

Bio

Fatima & Amna Sultan are 10 and 8-year-old founders of Two Sisters on a Mission and authors of the book “Anything is Possible”. The book has a deeper purpose of inspiring others to follow their dreams regardless of their age. They have faced the Dragons in Dragons’ Den (season 14) and inspired thousands through over 40 keynotes in major conferences and business competitions. Their speeches are not about their accomplishments but rather the idea that anything is possible if you care enough about your purpose and are willing to take action on behalf of those that need your help. Canada’s Youngest Social Entrepreneurs are on a mission to make a real difference.


Title: Anything is Possible with Love and Hard Work

Abstract

Anything is possible. We all have the power and the responsibility to make a difference. The future of the world depends on it” These were the final thoughts when Fatima & Amna Sultan decided to take action at the age of 10 and 8 and do their part. They are now authors and successful founders of the social entrepreneurship Two Sisters on a Mission. They faced the Dragons in Dragons’ Den and have inspired thousands around the world through 40 keynotes in major business. Their speech is not just about their journey but rather the idea that we all have the power to make a difference.

Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/s/998624786

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJN--iKtx-8

Bio

John Holmberg is a professor of physical resource theory and he also holds Sweden’s first UNESCO chair in education for sustainable development. His background is in physics and in his doctoral dissertation he developed principles for a sustainable future, which received international dissemination through the Natural Step Foundation. His current research focuses on sustainability transitions and he is one of the founders of Chalmers Initiative for Innovation and Sustainability Transitions.


Title: Leading Universities towards a Sustainable Future — Cruise Mode

Abstract

At the end of UNESCO’s world conference in Aichi-Nagoya, Japan, 2014, summarizing the UN decade for education for sustainable development, it was suggested that the overall mission of higher education should be revised from mainly contributing to development to instead contributing to sustainable development. This raises two questions: 1) Can the Agenda 2030 inform us about what such a change in orientation will imply and 2) might this also signal a need to revise the mode of leading our universities? What can it imply for research, education, innovation and outreach? How can the cruise mode operation of these activities be enhanced by brave expeditions and why is it important?

Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/s/998624786

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJN--iKtx-8

10:30

Coffee Break

Location: MN Grand Hall
11:00

Sub-Plenary Concurrent Panel Sessions

Moderator: Ersoy Gulecoglu, Metrolinx

Panelists
  • Nille Juul-Sørensen, ARUP
  • Jeff Latto, Metrolinx
  • Dr. Oya Mercan, University of Toronto

Abstract

The Panel will share with participants how the sustainability landscape is changing in Canada and more specifically in Ontario in the area of public transportation through good design principles.

Panel members will share not only global best practice examples but will also discuss unique sustainability, demographic and new mobility challenges and opportunities we face in Ontario and how we overcome them through specific strategies, tactics and design solutions from the multi-billion-dollar Eglinton Crosstown Light Rail program, the GO Expansion Regional Express Rail, and Metrolinx's Transit Oriented Development initiative.

Participants will engage through questions, and learnings will be in sustaining and adapting to future through innovative design excellence thinking and applications.

Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/s/991288700

Moderator: Kris Hornburg, Manager, Program & Strategic Initiatives, City of Toronto

Panelists
  • Robert Dysiewicz, Sr. Manager, RNG Business Development – Enbridge Gas Inc.
  • Tej Gidda, Vice President, GHD
  • Carlyle Khan, Director, Infrastructure & Resource Management, Solid Waste Management Services, City of Toronto

Abstract

The purpose of this panel is to provide a holistic overview of the benefits, considerations, and opportunities related to renewable natural gas, with a particular focus on how to bring these complex infrastructure programs forward. Renewable natural gas is the lowest carbon, commercially available fuel in existence today, with lower well-to-wheel emissions than electric vehicles. In addition, the waste/wastewater sectors within government have yet to fully appreciate and commodify this resource, which can lead to significant economic and environmental benefits. While the technology to create and use renewable natural gas is not new, and has been utilized extensively in Europe, North America has been slower to transition and as such investing in partnerships to drive these infrastructure programs should be seen as an obvious strategy. With experts from municipal government, consulting and engineering firms, and the private utility sector, this panel will seek to provide an overview of the importance of how to set up these partnerships, the benefits that each must derive from this new opportunity, and a candid examination of some of the challenges presented throughout.

Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/s/960344818

Moderator: Ron Saporta, COO, Property Services & Sustainability, University of Toronto

Panelists
  • Andrew Arifuzzaman, Chief Administrative Officer, University of Toronto Scarborough
  • Saher Fazilat, Chief Administrative Officer, University of Toronto Mississauga
  • Liat Margolis, Director, Master of Landscape Architecture, Associate dean, Research
  • David Sinton, Professor, Mechanical Engineering, University of Toronto

Abstract

The University of Toronto (U of T) has a long-standing commitment to operational sustainability and environmental stewardship that continues to grow in momentum. In 2018, U of T joined the University Climate Change Coalition (UC3); a group of leading research universities in North America committed to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on their own campuses and in their communities. In line with this commitment, the University of Toronto set a goal to reducing our 2030 absolute GHG emissions to 37 per cent below our 1990 baseline level. Including growth this equates to more than 65,000 tonnes eCO2 reduction between now and 2030.

Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/s/571890243

Moderator: Robert Martellacci, MA EdTech, Founder & CEO, MindShare Learning Technology

Panelists
  • Catherine Chamberlain, Erin Mills Connects
  • Dr. Laura Gini-Newman, Consultant, The Critical Thinking Consortium, Co-Founder of FlourishCo.
  • Mary Nanavati, Co-Founder, Erin Mills Connects and FlourishCo.
  • Shawn Slack, MBA, Director of Information Technology and Chief Information Officer, City of Mississauga

Abstract

The SMART Cities movement is growing at a rapid pace around the globe. The promise of ubiquitous internet access and AI focused solutions to enhance the lives of big city residents and reduce traffic congestion is compelling. Vitally important to the SMART Cities movement is nurturing an integrated and seamless sustainable learning community that carries with it essential supports to promote the notion of seamless lifelong learning, in an increasingly complex world. This session will explore global competencies and related skills, the need to think critically and creatively both locally and globally, and the importance of well-being to nurture success through building community.

Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/j/637439945

12:30

Lunch

Location: MN Grand Hall
13:00

Tours of the University of Toronto Mississauga campus

Location: Leaving from MN Grand Hall

Organized by Amine Mikati, Rishabh Nanda, and Rylan Urban, current MScSM student | 30 participants per tour, registration is open now

Tour options are:

  • Campus Ecosystems Tour: Our campus hugs the shore of the Credit River, and our nature trail provides opportunities for seeing birds and other wildlife. | Led by: Professor Monika Havelka
  • Geothermal Tour: Learn about the ground-source heat pump system that provides low-carbon heating and cooling to the LEED silver certified Instructional Building at UTM. | Led by: Sustainability Office, UTM
  • Campus Green Features Tour: This tour will visit some of the campus’ green features. Stormwater management, green roofs, transportation initiatives, and LEED buildings will be viewed and discussed. | Led by: Sustainability Office, UTM

14:00

Concurrent Sessions

  • What Would a Just and Sustainable Society Look Like? A Participatory Scenario Development Approach to Education for Sustainable Development | Elaine Huang
  • The Transferrable Learning Circle (TLC): Five Principles to Sustainable and Holistic Lessons | Paul John Meighan
  • "Learning sustainability" in the ecovillage - early findings of a multiple case study of participation, praxis and transformative learning in four North American ecovillages | Lisa Mychajluk
  • Comparing Universities to Foster Sustainability | Manuel Vallee
  • Blogging for “Happy Family in Nature”: Parental Visitors’ Representation of Nature, Family Leisure, and Ideal Parenthood in Taiwan | Peihua Chao
  • Laudato si’, Four Years Later | Philippe Crabbé
  • Material Culture and (Un-) Sustainability: Beneath Representation | Peter Graham
  • Petro-Nostalgia and Conspicuous Pollution: Social Media Representations of Anti-Environmentalism Communities | Doug Tewksbury
  • The role of Hip Hop Music in the Environmental Movement. | Rachel Wang
  • Mapping Wetland Bathymetry in the Credit Valley Watershed | Zoe Bedford
  • Spatial and Temporal Trends in Lake Bathymetry in the Credit Valley Watershed | Monique Dosanjh
  • Hydrological Assessment of Multiple Precipitation Products | David Ma
  • Integration of Remote Sensing and Drainage Modeling for Improving Urban Stormwater Management | Zarin Mom
  • Evaluation of Remotely Sensed Soil Moisture Over the Great Lakes Region | Shadia Zaman
  • Monitoring Changes in Forest Growth-Decline Across a Suburbanizing Landscape: Extracting Useful Information from Nearly 50 Years of Landsat Imagery | Mitchell Bonney
  • Using Visualization Techniques as a Tool for Knowledge Translation | Meredith DeCock-Caspell
  • Tree Species Classification with Deep Multi-Task Learning | Connie Ko
  • Can Remote Sensing Detect Changes in the Decomposition Process? Implications for Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling | Cameron Proctor
  • Understanding the impact of legalization of Marijuana: A literature Review | Sparkles Ransom
  • Review of Methodologies for Assessing Sustainable Diets and Potential for Development of Harmonised Indicators | Paul Eme
  • Land Transformation and Human Health | Byomkesh Talukder
  • Understanding the Impact of Social Policy on Immigrants’ Access to Health Care: A Theoretical Framework | Fese Elonge
  • Words and Stories as Ironic Barriers to Adaptation | Brent Wood
  • Timbre Minesto Community Forests: an example of application of Transdisciplinary Theory and action for Sustainability | Padam Prakash Bhojvaid
  • Feminized Poverty and the Challenges of Operationalizing Sustainable Development Goal 5 in Nigeria: An NGO Experience | Ijeoma Eteng Emeribe
  • Necessity of indigenous water governance to achieve SDG 6 under climate change in Sri Lanka | Hetti Arachchige Hemachandra Jayasena
  • Substitution, forest species diversity, and timber market volatility | Mo Zhou
  • Engaging and Empowering Diverse Communities through Sustainable Food Education | Leticia Deawuo
  • Teaching Sustainability to Culinary Students: Graduating Sustainability-Minded Chefs? | Luciana Godoy
  • Tales of a Wiser and Appreciative Graduate Student: Movements towards an Understanding of the Social Sustainability of Civic Agriculture | Adam McLaughlin
  • Diet for a Sustainable Planet: Working at the Intersection of Sustainable Food Systems, Pedagogy and Transformative Change | Jennifer Sumner
  • Sustainable Food Systems Pedagogy and the Alternative Campus Tour | Michael Classens
  • Regulating Fear in the City: Managing and Policing Coyotes in Toronto | Bronwyn Clement and Susannah Bunce
  • Convivial Cohabitation: Bats in Toronto | Leesa Fawcett
  • Between Bio and Philia: Managing Affect in an Urban Institutional Assemblage | Erin Luther
  • What about the Squirrels? Sustainable Development Goal 11, Urban Sustainability, and the Eastern Grey Squirrel Population of Toronto | Tracy Timmins
  • Struggles over value: affect and avian encounters in the Greater Toronto Area | Susan Riddick
  • 16:00

    Coffee Break

    Location: MN Grand Hall
    16:30

    Concurrent Sessions

  • An Exploratory Study of Environmental Training Programs for Incarcerated Populations | Michelle Edwards and Caden Ziegler
  • Challenge Lab – Transformative Learning in Transdisciplinary University-Society Interaction for Navigating Sustainability Transitions | Johan Larsson
  • Love, Learn, Live: Analogous Ultimate Methodology of Ecosystems in Micro Environments teaches Authentic Sustainability in Macro Environment | Atilla Lendvai
  • Sacredness and the Anthropocene: How could mindful awareness advance the future prospects of Homo sapiens? | Paul Grogan
  • The Sacred Relationship Among God, the Land and the People in the First Testament: The Israelite Covenant as a Biblical Model of Socio-ecological Justice and Sustainability | Rose Mary Boissonneau
  • Cultivating and Sustaining Place as Relational | Annalea Theissen
  • For the Benefit of All Beings: Using Buddhist Ethics as a Framework for Sustainable Development | Matthew Regan
  • Stakeholders’ Perceptions about Urban Green Spaces and Subjective Wellbeing in Bhopal City of India – Towards Inclusive and Sustainable Urban Growth | Parul Rishi
  • Commuter Behaviour Change | Khushpal Brar
  • The Pursuit of Imperfection: How Flawed Products Can Reveal Valuable Process Information | Erin L Percival Carter
  • How Energy From Waste Facilities Impact Waste Diversion Behavior | Jaime Baxter
  • Food Waste Profile of Canadian Households | Komal Habib
  • Planetary Sustainability and the Earth's Orbital Plane | Jae Page
  • UTM’s New Science Building: Innovations in Laboratory Building Design | Ahmed Azhari
  • Integrative Sustainability Initiatives at the University of Toronto, University of Edinburgh (U of E) and Utrecht University (UU) | Nicolas Cote and Rutu Patel
  • Exploratory Review of Trauma-Informed Strategies: Building resiliency | Natasha Davis-Williams
  • Identifying trends and gaps in sustainability research focused on the SDGs: How is the National Autonomous University of Mexico? | Verónica Solares
  • Facilitated by: Amanda Klarer and Bella Lam

    Abstract

    Smallholder farmers are one of the most vulnerable populations to climate change. JGI Canada supports community-centred conservation by focusing on the interconnectedness of people, animals and the environment. The adoption of climate-smart agriculture (CSA) by smallholder farmers can create a more sustainable eco-system and improve livelihood resiliency. However, simply providing access to CSA technologies does not guarantee an uptake of the innovation by farmers. What conditions and factors trigger behavioural changes of smallholder farmers that could lead to the adoption of CSA? In this interactive session, participants will co-create sustainable system solutions to this question through a multi-disciplinary lens.

    Facilitated by: Mitchel Selby and Rylan Urban

    Abstract

    This engaging and interactive session will aim to solve one of the world's most pressing sustainability issues: the unprecedented rate of global species loss. Building on the 2019 IPBES Global Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, participants in this session will be guided through a systems thinking approach and encouraged to explore the many ways that they interact with and impact nature before converging on solutions to the problem, combining the knowledge and experience of those in the room.

    Abstract

    You and I want to avoid climate destabilization for the sake of our families’ futures. Unfortunately, that justification for action doesn’t work well in boardroom and executive suites. So, why have companies finally decided to collaborate with NGOs, governments, academics and each other to address climate change and not wait others to fix it for them? This talk will reveal the three behind-the-scenes forces that are mobilizing for-profit enterprises to roll up their sleeves and help us address the biggest existential threat to human civilization on our fragile planet … and it has nothing to do with the plight of polar bears.

    18:00

    Training Workshops - 40 participants per session; registration will open soon

    Facilitated by: Jennifer Niece and Julie Kee of 360 Energy

    Abstract

    Climate change is happening, and if we don’t slow it down, nothing else within the umbrella of “sustainability” matters. Participants in this hour-long workshop will learn tangible measures they can take to understand the source of their energy-related GHG emissions, how to best prioritize action to reduce, and how to calculate the emissions and cost savings from their actions. Strong savings in energy and emissions can be the catalyst to launch broader sustainability planning.

    Workshop Format and Learning Outcomes:
    A combination of lectures, facilitated discussion and workshop activities will teach participants to map out their energy baselines, learn how they’re charged for energy, and how to use all of that information to best prioritize their energy management activity. Participants will enhance their knowledge of how progressive companies evaluate and justify the costs of energy improvement measures (though there are many ways to save that don’t require capital!).

    Target Audience:
    This workshop is best suited to mid-size to large energy users in industry, manufacturing, agriculture and greenhouses, as well as universities, hospitals, train/transit facilities, and municipal services such as recreation centres and water pumping stations.

    Energy management is not a one-time project; the processes described in this workshop should be repeated regularly to ensure adaptation to changing energy markets and changing energy use within any facility. Being a leader in managing energy and in sustainability takes a bit of work, but it’s well worth the effort, financially, socially and environmentally.

    Facilitated by: Radha Mahraj

    Abstract

    The goal of the workshop is to design a social media campaign to combat consumerism with a specific call to action. Consumerism is a threat to sustainable development. The pattern and level of consumption directly impact the success of sustainable programs and policies. The workshop provides the participants with the tools required to develop a social media campaign to motivate consumers into making more environmentally positive consumption choices. The workshop will harness participants’ creativity to extract lessons and inspiration from previous social media sustainability campaigns. This will be used to facilitate the design of a new consumer focused social media campaign that can be shared on multiple platforms. A key ingredient in the design of a successful social media campaign requires understanding the nature of the target audience. Participants will be introduced to the four categories of consumers. They will tap into personal narratives, emotions and values to craft a social media campaign that is engaging and fosters commitment from the respective target audience.

    Expected Outcomes:

    At the end of the session participants will be able to design a social media campaign that:

    • Establishes a clearly defined goal
    • Identifies the target audience
    • Moulds the message to connect with the target audience
    • Identifies the appropriate social media platform to effectively reach the target audience

    Methodology:
    The workshop will employ collaborative learning and creative brainstorming.

    Facilitated by: Michael Classens and L. Anders Sandberg

    Abstract

    Campus tours are motivated by a variety of objectives, including student recruitment and retention, and often curated with ‘official’ narratives designed to reinforce institutional self-image and enhance institutional brand. The Alternative Campus Tour (ACT) project refracts the campus tour methodology through a critical pedagogy lens in service of the broader project of critical sustainability education. Drawing from over a decade of experience, this training workshop will outline the positive impacts of the ACT project, and provide participants with insight and guidance on how to introduce an ACT on their own campus.

    The training workshop will include, (1) a conceptual overview of the pedagogical and political value of the ACT, (2) short case studies and examples from existing ACTs, (3) a collaborative exercise to support participants to develop a preliminary narrative for a site on their own campus, and (4) a discussion focused on the practical elements involved in starting a campus ACT.

    The anticipated learning outcomes for participants in this training workshop include, (1) an appreciation for the value and challenges of establishing an ACT, (2) a familiarity with existing ACT models and resources, and (3) an understanding of how to establish an ACT.

    This training workshop is intended for anyone interested in initiating a sustainability and social justice-focused alternative tour on their campus, including students, staff and faculty.

    Facilitated by: Parul Rishi

    Abstract

    Psychological responses to climate distress and adaptation are essential concepts in the broader sphere of sustainability management. Although both awareness and insight in the importance of mitigation and adaptation have increased significantly in the last few decades; there is still a need to enhance the capacity of professionals in these vulnerable areas further to boost the behavioural adaptation process.

    The world is the home of multiple religions, and diversified spirituality harmoniously coexisting across cultures. Hence, spirituality is also having diversified explanations across the globe but strongly considered as a religion-neutral concept, widely applicable in differing perspectives. Spiritual intelligence and belief systems are considered to be actively instrumental in framing the psychological subset of attitudes across cultures, which subsequently determine the way sustainability management in society takes place. Current concern over global climate change stems, in part, from the predominant evidence that its causes are anthropogenic, i.e. the result of human behaviour.

    Psycho-spirituality contains the underpinning assumption that the psychological mindset creates, or strongly influences spirituality and suggests that one can learn to adapt with the changing climatic scenario through spiritual modes like mindfulness, behavioural restraint and positive existential transcendence in order to manage the sustainability of planet earth. It can subconsciously control materialistic urges leading to ecologically unsustainable growth and development on one hand and development of positive motivations and emotions towards changing climatic scenario on the other.

    In this regard, the proposed training workshop aims at strengthening behavioural adaptation to changing climatic scenario, by overcoming the psychological barriers to sustainability management, enhancing the knowledge base in psycho-spiritual systems and developing the capacity to address climate change linked adversities through mindfulness and other socio-behavioural techniques.

    Learning Outcomes

    • Overcoming the Psychological barriers to sustainability management regarding climate change
    • Understanding psycho-Spiritual strategies to sustainability management, especially mindfulness behavioural restraint and positive existential transcendence

    Pedagogy

    • Experiential exercises, psychometric assessments, interactive lecture-discussion and group learning

    Target Audience

    • Professionals/Academics

    19:30

    End Day One

    Time Event
    8:00

    Registration & Morning Refreshments

    Outside IB 120
    8:45

    Plenary Sessions  |  Chaired by: Soo Min Toh

    Bio

    Gregory Cajete is a Native American educator whose work is dedicated to honoring the foundations of Indigenous knowledge in education. He is a Tewa Indian from Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico. He has pioneered reconciling indigenous perspectives in sciences with a Western academic setting. His focus is teaching “culturally based science, with its emphasis on health and wellness. He has served as a New Mexico Humanities scholar and as a member of the New Mexico Arts Commission. He worked at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico, for twenty-one years, and is a is a practicing ceramic, pastel, and metal artist. He is the former Director of Native American Studies and currently a Professor in the College of Education at the University of New Mexico.


    Title: Foundations for Sustainable Indigenous Education and Community Re-Vitalization in Response to Global Climate Change

    Abstract

    There is a crisis of “sustainability” which has evolved as a result of the global application of the Western development paradigm of “progress” through unfettered growth with little thought for social, cultural and ecological consequences. The Western development paradigm and its focus on material economic indicators as the sole measure of development perpetuates a distorted vision of what is in fact a multi-dimensional and multi-contextual socio – cultural process. This is especially problematic when attempting to create strategies to address the effects of global climate change on Indigenous communities.

    The key goals of this search have been efforts to find sustainable, culturally responsive, and community based models which help to “build Indigenous communities” rather than continue to perpetuate their long standing social or cultural issues.

    Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/s/525266347

    YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJN--iKtx-8

    Bio

    Ersilia Serafini has been President of Summerhill since 2009. Ersilia leads a team of over 100 individuals across Canada and focuses Summerhill’s commitment to deliver impactful, results-oriented programs that achieve measureable reductions in energy use.

    At the community level, Ersilia acts as the President for the Clean Economy Fund; is a former Director of the Board of Ontario’s Independent Electricity Systems Operator (IESO); is an active member and Regional Forum Officer for the Young Presidents Organization. She also volunteers her time with the Parent Council at St. Cecilia Catholic School and the Foundation for Prader-Willi Research Canada.


    Title: Sustainability – From Theory to Action!

    Abstract

    As a proud alumna of UTM’s Environment program, Ersilia will share her story of how multi-disciplinary coursework in sustainability shaped her career path and lead her to becoming CEO of Summerhill. She will share examples from her business that demonstrate the value of approaching sustainability in what some may consider non-traditional ways. Ersilia will be provocative and engage the audience to consider if they want results or if they want to be right? She will highlight her experience in taking action to achieve impactful results rather than spending time making sure everyone agrees with her philosophy.

    Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/s/525266347

    YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJN--iKtx-8

    10:30

    Coffee Break

    Location: MN Grand Hall
    11:00

    Sub-Plenary Concurrent Panel Sessions

    Moderator: Josée Johnston, Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Panelists

    • Shyon Baumann, Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto
    • Emily Huddart Kennedy, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of British Colombia
    • Norah MacKendrick, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Rutgers University
    • Dietling Stolle, Professor, Department of Political Science, McGill University

    Abstract

    This session will address the theme of sustainability from the perspective of consumers, consumer culture, and consumer politics. The practice of green consumption has significantly expanded over the past decades, leading some activists to wonder if it has become a meaningless form of greenwashing. Panelists in this session will avoid pat responses to green consumption that either simplistically praise, or straightforwardly condemn these practices. Instead, they will struggle with questions like the following: how can green consumption lead to political engagement or awareness on environmental issues? How does the presence of green consumption options obfuscate the need for state regulation on environmental issues? How are green consumer practices linked to class inequality? The panel will demonstrate how social science works to study green consumption in a way that a) appreciates everyday forms of political engagement and environmentalism that occur through consumption tasks, often assigned to women, while b) considering larger structural reforms required to address pressing sustainability challenges.

    Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/s/138209793

    Moderator: Wesley Gee, Director of Sustainability, The Work Design Communications Ltd.

    Panelists

    • Tim Faveri, Vice President, Sustainability and Shared Value, Maple Leaf Foods
    • Wesley Gee, Director, Sustainability, The Works Design Communications Ltd.
    • Whitney McWade, Senior Advisor, Sustainability Strategy, Disclosure and Impact Measurement, BMO Financial Group

    Abstract

    Now entering our eighth year, The Works has conducted annual research on sustainability communications and reporting. Our research involves reviewing reporting (e.g., PDF, website, social media) from over 100 companies headquartered across the globe, and covers eleven, topics, ranging from materiality and global frameworks, to storytelling and digital strategy. For frameworks, for instance, our research covers trends and best practice relating to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), Taskforce on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) Recommendations, GRI Standards, and the Integrated Reporting (IR) Framework.

    Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/s/391953157

    Moderator: Neda Maki

    Panelists

    • Mike Balkwill, Campaign Director, Wellington Water
    • Robert Case, Associate Professor, Department of Social Development Studies, University of Waterloo
    • Susan Glasauer, Associate Professor, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Guelph
    • James Gordon, Canadian Songwriter, Playwright, Musician, Producer, and Community Activists
    • Makasa Looking Horse, Youth Leader and Indigenous Activist, Six Nations

    Abstract

    This panel discussion features representatives from Six Nations of the Grand River, the Wellington Water Watchers, and Guelph City Council who have been involved in the contentious debate surrounding Nestlé’s water extraction from wells situated around Guelph, Ontario. The inadequate federal and provincial regulation regarding groundwater extraction in Ontario has led to corporations like Nestlé extracting clean groundwater and bottling it for sale all over North America.

    This roundtable brings together academics, activists, and First Nations leaders to discuss a series of urgent questions across disciplines and across the narrow bounds of the university: Whose water is it, anyway? How can it be sustainably managed? How is Nestlé dealing with First Nations’ inherent right to land and water? How is groundwater currently regulated in Ontario and what legal and political avenues are activists and corporate actors pursuing in this contentious struggle over groundwater? What is the science of groundwater, and to what degree can aquifers be measured? What are the ways forward?

    Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/s/316073854

    Moderator: Brent Smiley, Director of IT Asset Disposition, Compugen Finance Inc.

    Panelists

    • Willa Black, Vice President, Corporate Affairs, Cisco
    • Frances Edmonds, Head of Sustainability at HP
    • Robert Santin, Director, OEM Development (Microsoft Authorized Refurbisher Program), Microsoft Canada

    Abstract

    2019 is being hailed as “The Year of Sustainability”. Compugen’s IT Asset Disposition program, Green4Good would be pleased to host a panel of industry experts to discuss how Sustainability and IT-eWaste are becoming inseparable.

    We will use real life examples to show how requirements around sustainability have pushed the IT industry to take action to positively impact the Environment, while advances in IT help further sustainability progress and initiatives.

    Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/j/113977253

    Moderator: Gavin Hilson, Professor, Surrey Business School

    Panelists

    • Martin J. Clifford, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy, University of Delaware
    • Suleman Dauda, Surrey Business School, University of Surrey, United Kingdom
    • Yanfei Hu, Surrey Business School, University of Surrey, Guildford
    • Cynthia Kumah, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Carleton University
    • Joshua Sandin, School of Management, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey
    • Titus Sauerwein, Surrey Business School, University of Surrey, United Kingdom

    Abstract

    In sub-Saharan Africa, artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) – low-tech, labour-intensive mineral processing and extraction – provides direct employment to an estimated 25-30 million people and has created many millions of other income-earning opportunities in the downstream and upstream industries it has spawned. Research conducted over the past two decades has captured in considerable detail the sector’s economic importance in sub-Saharan Africa, including how it dovetails subsistence agriculture; is largely poverty-driven, employing people who have few, if any, alternative income-earning opportunities; and how, it has fast become the region’s most important rural nonfarm activity. Most ASM activities found in sub-Saharan Africa, however, are found in the informal economy, which makes it challenging to make the sector a centrepiece of policies and programs implemented in the region in line with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The presentations delivered on this panel will both showcase ASM’s importance in sub-Saharan Africa, and underscore how, if formalized and properly supported, the sector could alleviate significant poverty and catalyze economic development region-wide, in the process, helping to fulfill a number of lofty targets linked to the SDGs.

    Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/s/542555873

    12:30

    Lunch

    Location: MN Grand Hall
    14:00

    Concurrent Sessions

  • Understanding the Opportunity and State of Sustainable Procurement in Canada’s Public Sector | Monica DaPonte
  • Understanding the Future of Canada-UK Trade Relationships in a Circular Economy Context | Deborah de Lange
  • Business for the SDGs: Corporate Social Responsibility 2.0 at HP Canada | Frances Edmonds
  • Supporting Health Through Sustainable Health Care Procurement:Opportunities and Challenges | Fiona Miller
  • Value Creation Models and the Six Capitals | Petra Dilling
  • Ranking Turkish Manufacturing Companies Based on Sustainable Practices. A Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) Approach | Damla Rurak Usar
  • Science-Based Carbon Emissions Targets | Jody Grewal
  • Actions and Words: Disclosure is a Big Step for Corporate Sustainability, but Does it Necessarily Translate to Action? | Caitlin McHose
  • Decolonization, Sacred Reciprocity, and Creating from the Quantum Field: A 3-Point Plan for Reinventing Environmentalism that Sources Our Doing From a Different Quality of Being | Blake Poland
  • Sacred Time and Sacred Place: Sabbath and Sabbatical as Vehicles of Restraint | Tanhum Yoreh
  • An Animal Among Animals | Sara Kay Maston
  • Rebordering Sanctuary: Multispecies Communities and the Sacred | Hilary Cunningham and Stephen Scharper
  • Sustainability: The Transformation of Human Evolution | Ian Lipton
  • Let’s Get Real: Societal Transformation and Ecosystem Renewal into the Anthropocene | Robert MacNeil Christie
  • Transdisciplinary Culture - Responsive Reactions and Plans within Place | Susan Aaron
  • Conservation of Canada’s Natural Landscapes | Robert Wilson
  • Insect Farms in Your Neighborhood: Transforming Organic Waste Into High Quality Food | Greg Wegner
  • Evaluating the Efficacy of Sustainability Initiatives in Port Sector of Canada | Jennifer MacNeil
  • Sustainability in Healthcare Field | Lisa James
  • Facilitated by: Brad Zarnett, Eco-Opportunity Consulting and Raz Godelnik, School of Design Strategies


    Abstract

    Where has corporate Sustainability and its cousins; CSR, Impact Investing, Profit with Purpose, and Social Innovation actually taken us? Some may argue that it’s delivering a cultural shift in how we conduct business and some might argue that it’s a slow process and that we just need more time. But the harsh truth is that despite all of the positive inputs that are being added to the capitalist recipe, the end product is becoming more brutal and difficult to swallow.

    Every major ecosystem on the planet is in decline and the positive feedback loops around climate change are getting close. Socially, the impacts are equally worrisome; we’re experiencing the worst inequality in 100 years and almost 80% of Americans are living paycheck to paycheck.

    We need to stop pretending that the “greening” of business is working. We’ve reached a point where the very notion that business is in some way working hard to address our environmental and social challenges is at best misleading and at worst fraudulent; the evidence strongly suggests that the greatest efforts of corporations is to maintain the status quo.

    In this workshop we will explore how we got to this point, who or what is blocking progress and how can we move forward in a way that ensures that we are able to pass along a functioning planet to the next generation.

    Zoom Link*: https://zoom.us/j/745091180
    * Note: This session is being recorded only, not live streamed.

    Facilitated by: ClearBlue Markets


    Abstract

    In October 2016, Canada announced the Pan-Canadian Approach to Pricing Carbon Pollution in order to meet its commitments for the Paris Agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fight climate change. As of January 1, 2019 every Canadian province and territory has a carbon pricing program. ClearBlue Markers in partnership with its MScSM Co-op students will provide an in-depth look at carbon pricing across the country and the risks and opportunities of putting a price on pollution.

    Facilitated by: Marcatus QED


    Abstract

    How much do we know about the lives behind the food we consume? Who produces our beloved chocolate, processes our cup of java, or carefully pollinates the vanilla for our birthday cake? The food we eat daily comes from a diversity of geographies and is touched by a diversity of lives.
    Smallholder farmers produce over 70% of the world’s food and women play a key yet under-valued role.

    This session will explore challenges and barriers women face in the global agri-food sector, highlight the benefits of uplifting women farmers, and will showcase key roles businesses can play to create change.

    15:30

    Poster Presentation Viewing, Industry Display, and Reception

    Featuring presentations by:

  • An Initial Survey of Canadian Charitable Agricultural Donation Tax Credit Filings | William Coney
  • Northern Air Transportation Challenges and Effects on Indigenous Communities | Pia Dimayuga
  • Obesity Prevalence and Quantitative Estimates of Dietary Intakes of Households in Butaritari, Kiribati Islands | Paul Eme
  • Time for Business: Best Practices for Improving Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional (ICI) Waste Diversion in the Alberta Capital Region | Megan Ann Hardman
  • Public Perception of Urban Stormwater Ponds as Environmental Amenities | Charlotte Heller
  • Defining 'Flushability' for Sewer Use | Anum Khan
  • Does Land Use Drive Temperature Change? A Remote Sensing Perspective into the Cataraqui Region Conservation Authority's Watershed | Matthew Senyshen
  • The Curriculum Development of Global Sustainability Education (GSE) for Climate Change | Arushi Sood
  • Improving Community Natural Resource Governance | Yiwen Zhang
  • Operationalizing Responsible Innovation in IS Innovation Projects | Sarah Cherki El Idrissi
  • as well as:

  • MScSM Class of 2020
  • 17:45

    Plenary Session  |  Registration for UTM community is open now

    Bio

    Dr. David Suzuki is a scientist, broadcaster, author, and co-founder of the David Suzuki Foundation. He is Companion to the Order of Canada and a recipient of UNESCO’s Kalinga Prize for science, the United Nations Environment Program medal, the 2012 Inamori Ethics Prize, the 2009 Right Livelihood Award, and UNEP’s Global 500. Dr. Suzuki is Professor Emeritus at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and holds 29 honorary degrees from universities around the world. He is familiar to television audiences as host of the CBC science and natural history television series The Nature of Things, and to radio audiences as the original host of CBC Radio’s Quirks and Quarks, as well as the acclaimed series It’s a Matter of Survival and From Naked Ape to Superspecies. In 1990 he co-founded with Dr. Tara Cullis, The David Suzuki Foundation to “collaborate with Canadians from all walks of life including government and business, to conserve our environment and find solutions that will create a sustainable Canada through science-based research, education and policy work.” His written work includes more than 55 books, 19 of them for children. Dr. Suzuki lives with his wife and family in Vancouver, B.C.


    Title: The Challenge of the 21st Century: Setting the Bottom Line in the Anthropocene

    Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/j/724272653

    YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJN--iKtx-8

    19:30

    End Day Two

    Time Event
    8:00

    Registration & Morning Refreshments

    Location: Outside IB 120
    8:45

    Plenary Sessions  |  Chaired by: Joan Simalchik

    Bio

    Scott Frickel is Professor of Sociology at the Institute for the Study of Environment and Society. He holds a Ph.D. from University of Wisconsin-Madison (2000). Before coming to Brown he held faculty appointments at Tulane University and Washington State University, where he was the Boeing Distinguished Professor of Environmental Sociology. His research and teaching interests center on the intersections of nature, knowledge, and politics. A growing feature of his current research involves developing new approaches for identifying and measuring socio-environmental change and developing theories to explain those patterns. He also studies inequality in science and technology and chemical residues as cultural, material, and political objects – both subjects of current book projects.


    Title: Sites Unseen: Uncovering Hidden Hazards and Hidden Lessons for Sustainable Urban Futures

    Abstract

    This talk examines the interplay of urban demography, industrialization and risk management to identify local mechanisms driving the socio-environmental change. The study is informed by spatial and historical comparison of hazardous waste site accumulation in four major U.S. cities (Minneapolis, New Orleans, Philadelphia, and Portland, OR) over five decades, from 1955 to 2008. Data for the analysis include detailed site-, tract-, and city-level information gathered for thousands of current and former industrial sites – most of which remain unacknowledged in government reports and hazardous site lists. Results show how industrial churning, residential churning, and risk containment intersect to produce cumulative socio-environmental transformations of urban lands. The study holds important lessons for sustainable urban futures.

    Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/s/527925682

    YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJN--iKtx-8
    * Note: Note: This session is not being recorded or livestreamed but is being used in order to allow remote participant to present.

    Bio

    John Cartwright is the President of the Toronto & York Region Labour Council, representing 200,000 union members in every sector of the economy. A carpenter by trade, he has led numerous campaigns for social, economic and climate justice. He is Chair of the Council of Canadians, Vice-Chair of the United Way of Greater Toronto and co-chairs the Toronto Community Benefits Network.

    Read more about John's work in Greenprint for Greater Toronto.


    Title: Respect People, Work, Communities – Climate and Transition

    Abstract

    The global climate crisis is real. The 2015 Paris Accord demands that we use all of our skills and knowledge to plan for a sustainable and equitable low-carbon economy. The goal of resilience is not just for physical spaces but also social infrastructure, which will be tested by storms, droughts, and wildfires, as well as the migration of millions of climate refugees.

    It is possible to make effective choices if learn from past economic and social change. Long-term planning, focused investment, and deep respect for workers and their communities are the only way that justice will be assured in this global transition.

    Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/s/527925682

    YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJN--iKtx-8
    * Note: Note: This session is not being recorded or livestreamed but is being used in order to allow remote participant to present.

    10:30

    Coffee Break

    Location: MN Grand Hall
    11:00

    Concurrent Sessions

    Moderator: Dr. Mimi Marrocco, Faculty Leader for the Certificate in Corporate Social Responsibility, St. Michael's College, University of Toronto

    Panelists

  • Dr. James Ginther, Dean, Faculty of Theology, University of St. Michael’s College, Toronto School of Theology
  • Dr. Robert Logan, Fellow, University of St. Michael’s College, University of Toronto
  • Dr. Moira McQueen, Executive Director, Canadian Catholic Bioethics Institute, Member, Vatican Theological Commission

  • Abstract

    The focus of the panel could be a discussion and a dialogue among scientists and theologians of Pope Francis’ encyclical Laudato Si with its focus on global warming and climate change. In the encyclical Pope Francis calls for such a dialogue. In Paragraph 13 and 14 of Laudato Si he wrote: “Here I want to recognize, encourage and thank all those striving in countless ways to guarantee the protection of the home which we share. Particular appreciation is owed to those who tirelessly seek to resolve the tragic effects of environmental degradation on the lives of the world’s poorest. Young people demand change. They wonder how anyone can claim to be building a better future without thinking of the environmental crisis and the sufferings of the excluded. I urgently appeal, then, for a new dialogue about how we are shaping the future of our planet.” The purpose of this panel is to enter into the dialogue between science and religion that Pope Francis has called for.

    Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/j/659611099

  • Sustainability of Mass Timber Construction: Case Studies from Global Cities | Nadine Ibrahim
  • Food for mega-cities using electric vehicles? A comparison of Hong Kong, Vancouver B.C., and Toronto | Graeme Lang
  • "Water Issues and Urban Sustainable Development in Changing Climate: An Action Plan for Quezon City, Philippines | Tabassam Raza
  • Framework for Evaluating Water Security in Megacities from an Environmental and Socioeconomic Perspective | Tatiana Trindade
  • A Food Charter as a Critical Food Guidance Tool in Rural Areas: The Case of Bruce & Grey Counties in Southwestern Ontario | Donald Cole
  • Food Donation Tax Credits: Investigating Usage Among Farmers | Tara Immell
  • The Role of Institutions at Multiple Scales | Chaiti Seth
  • Zoom Link*: https://zoom.us/j/106368008
    * Note: Note: This session is not being recorded or livestreamed but is being used in order to allow remote participant to present.

  • When A Conspiracy Theory Comes to Town: The Policy Impacts of the Right-Wing Populist Movement against Sustainability Planning | Ellen Berrey, Fatima Al Saadie, Kristen Bass, Matthew Halsall, Ariel Minott, and Henry Rhyu
  • Rural Refractions of Ecological Instability: What the Original Redneck Fishing Tournament Illustrates About Rural Ecological Change | Jordan Besek
  • Ontario’s Left to Right Conservation Pendulum Swing and its Impacts on Environmental Conservation | Tom Hilditch
  • The Political Economy of Media Streaming: An Analysis of Environmental and Economic Sustainability | Vincent Manzerolle and Leslie Meier
  • Cleaning Up the Commons for a Profit: Insights from the History of By-Product Development in Early Cotton & Petroleum Industry | Pierre Desrochers and Joanna Szurmak
  • Lake Chad’s households: Capital growth or stagnation? | Jake Organ
  • Transitions to Sustainability inPeri-urban India: UsingAdaptive Pathways to cope with vulnerability and build resilience | Sharlene L. Gomes
  • Urban and Municipal Sustainability Science, Multidisciplinary, Urban Dev of Contaminated Industrial Sites | Mark Hegan
  • West Bolton Sustainable Neighbourhood Action Plan (SNAP) – An Example of a Collaborative Approach to Urban Renewal at the Neighbourhood Scale | Justyna Braithwaite and Victor Perez-Amado
  • A transdisciplinary approach for livable and sustainable cities: towards a compromise between air quality and climate change | Camille Payre
  • Migrants' Labour Market Integration Through Online Discussion Forums | Daniel Gulanowski
  • Reward Management in International Non-Government Organizations: A Values-Based Approach | Ishbel McWha-Hermann
  • China’s Migrant Workers: The Blind Spot on its Sustainability Policy Agenda | Marina Schmitz
  • 12:30

    Lunch

    Location: MN Grand Hall
    13:30

    Concurrent Sessions

  • Disclosure of emerging trends: Evidence from Climate Change Business Opportunities | Jody Grewal
  • Factors Determining Forest Products Companies’ Intension to Participate in Carbon Emission Trading | Ning Li
  • Estimation of Fuel wood-induced Carbon Emission from the use of Improved Cook Stoves by selected Households in Kwara state, Nigeria | Innocent Onah
  • Chinese Business at the Dawn of its Emission Trading Scheme (ETS): The Case of Forest Products Industry in China | Ning Li
  • Cultivating Place: A Socio-historical Analysis of Community Garden Planning in Seattle | Charlotte Glennie
  • A Policy Mix Analysis on Energy Efficiency Policies Pertaining to Buildings in Toronto and Calgary | John Lau
  • Decisions on Energy Supply and Sustainability: Opportunities and Challenges for Existing Urban Areas | Jennifer McKellar
  • The Stocks and Flows of Construction Materials in the Region of Waterloo | Aida Mollaei
  • Growing Green and Eating Clean? Tensions Between Producer and Consumer Perspectives in the Creation of a Climate-friendly Food System | Bryan Dale
  • Green and Healthy | Sarah Elton
  • Can Dietary Guidelines Advance Ecological Sustainability? | Barbara Seed
  • Critical Food Guidance: Eating Toward Meaningful Change | Jennifer Sumner
  • Exposure, Impacts and Coping with Flood Events in Western Amazonia: Lessons from the2011 Flood Along the Ucayali River, Peru | Christian Abizaid
  • Deliver of State and Non-state Social Protection Instruments and Services Post Tropical Storm Erika in Dominica – A Spatial Analysis | Esther Lambert
  • The Four-Pillar Approach towards Sustainable Water Management | Romila Verma
  • Mind Under Matter: Analogous Ultimate Methodology of Psychology uncovers Microcosmic Metaphysical Foundations of Physical Sustainability in Macrocosm | Attila Lendvai
  • The Scientific, Social, Political and Ethical Dimensions of Global Warming and Climate Change | Robert K. Logan
  • Forest Conservation for Climate Resilience in Greater Angkor, Cambodia | Leah Marajh
  • Go Forth and Multiply” – Population, Contraception and Sustainable Development in Roman Catholic Teaching and Laudato Si | Michael Ross
  • Impervious to Sustainability: Social change and land cover change in Greater Houston, USA | Kevin Smiley
  • Land-Use Tools, Development Paths, and Local Strategies: The Role of Policy in Developing Local Resiliency | Leith Deacon
  • What Does the Farmer Bring to the Market? Exploring Farmers' Market Offerings by Geographic and Social Location | Justin Schupp
  • Review of Methodological Choices and Their Consistency with Principles of Sustainability Assessment of Farm-Level Decisions | Vivek Arulnathan
  • Learning Our Way Out of Global Challenges: How Might Social Learning Strengthen Transdisciplinary Collaboration Towards the SDGs | Elaine Huang
  • Identifying Forest Road Construction Year by Integrating Change Detection from Historical Remotely Sensed Images and Knowledge-Based Connectivity Rules | Dongmei Chen
  • Examination of Soft Power (Diplomacy) in Inter-Basin Water Transfer Project Aimed at Connecting Lake Chad and the Congo River | Caner Sayan
  • Sustainable Fishing for Small-Scaled Circular Economy: “Diverse economies” in Exploration for the Wetland National Parks in Vietnam | Phan Loan
  • 15:00

    Coffee Break

    Location: MN Grand Hall
    15:30

    Concurrent Sessions

  • The Myth of Atlantis and the Deforestation of Classical Athens | Ben Akrigg
  • Energy Heritage: Narrative Inheritances in the Albertan Oil Public | Judith Ellen Brunton
  • The Art of Sounding Sustainable | Sherry Lee
  • Catastrophe and Sustainability in the Technosphere | Ryan Hagen
  • Disasters As Suffering Out of Place | Jacob Remes
  • Boots on the ground. Tech in the cloud | Colin Campbell
  • Estimation of Static corporate sustainability interactions | Damla Rurak Usar
  • Human Sustainability, Relational Coordination,and Worker Outcomes: A Conceptual Framework | Elli Meleti
  • Disaster Risk Reduction and Business Continuity Planning for Microfinance Institutions | Rolando Victoria
  • Interrogating Amazon’s Sustainability Innovation | Brett Caraway
  • A Consumer Centric Approach for Ecological Viability | Radha Maharaj
  • Communities Lead the Way Toward a Circular Future: Will New Policies Keep Up? | Kiara Winans
  • A Review Of Solar Energy Policy And Applications In Ghana Towards Sustainable Development Goal 7 And 13 | Araba Amo-Aidoo
  • Media Framing of Alternative Energies in Saskatchewan and North Dakota | Patrick Braszak
  • How to Transition the Urban Freight Industry in Canada to a Low-Carbon Economy | Anureet Kaur
  • Innovation and Transfer of Clean Technologies in the Post-Paris International Climate Regime | Mahatab Uddin
  • Facilitated by: AIESEC


    Abstract

    AIESEC is the world’s largest youth organization that facilities international volunteer and professional development opportunities for university students. Each and every international project that AIESEC facilities aims to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
    Through this workshop, student speakers from AIESEC at the University of Toronto Chapter will share their exchange stories. More importantly, they will outline how these experiences have impacted their understanding of SDGs, possible hands-on opportunities to engage with SDGs as students, and how going on exchanges have impacted their future goals both professionally and personally.
    This workshop offers an introduction to potential possibilities that university students could consider as they wish to make actionable solutions in addressing Sustainability. The workshop will also consider the benefits and limitations of current solutions, particularly with volunteerism, in achieving sustainable development.

    17:00

    Closing Plenary Session

    Speakers: Shashi Kant and Soo Min Toh

    Location:MN 1210
    17:30

    End Day Three